Schedule

Saturday, December 7


7:00 pm–8:30 pm
Registration

New this year! Skip the early morning line and get your conference materials when you arrive.



Sunday, December 8


Pre-Conference Workshop

The Urban Forest in New Orleans: Parks and Preservation


7:00 am–8:00 am
Registration

7:00 am–8:00 am
Continental Breakfast

8:00 am–4:30 pm
Workshop

Travel with ASCA to City Park New Orleans and rotate through field stations the first part of the day. Afterwards, buses will bring participants to the Tree of Life at the New Orleans Audubon Park for a tour and to hear how staff manages efforts to preserve over 2,000 historic trees. Lunch in City Park will be provided.

City Park New Orleans, established over 150 years ago in the heart of the city, comprises a total of 1,300 acres and is one of the oldest urban parks in the country. It offers visitors the largest collection of mature live oaks in the world. Trees in the oldest grove are over 800 years old.

For more than a century, people have enjoyed Audubon Park, an oasis with allées of ancient live oaks, a tranquil 1.8-mile jogging path, a lagoon, picnic shelters, and playgrounds.

→ View the workshop schedule.


7:00 pm–8:00 pm
Registration/Committee Meetings

ASCA Committees will be informed well in advance if here is to be a meeting.





Monday, December 9


7:00 am–6:00 pm
Registration

7:00 am–8:00 am
Continental Breakfast

8:00 am–8:15 am
Welcome Remarks

8:15 am–9:45 am
Growing a Climate Resilient City—A Melbourne Perspective on Urban Forestry
David Callow, Urban Forest and Ecology, City of Melbourne, Australia

Melbourne has long been regarded as Australia’s “garden city,” but more than a decade of drought and severe water restrictions have left the city of Melbourne’s tree population in a state of unprecedented decline.

Melbourne is also getting warmer. Since 1950, the mean annual temperature in the central city has increased by 1.7 degrees Celsius. By 2090, the temperature is predicted to increase by another 3 degrees Celsius.

Full Description →

The city of Melbourne Urban Forest Strategy seeks to manage this change and provide a strategic framework for the urban forest. A core focus of the strategy is to adapt the urban forest to climate change by increasing forest diversity and to mitigate extreme heat in the city by expanding tree canopy cover on public land from 22 percent to 40 percent by 2040.

Delivery of the strategy is underpinned by the Urban Forest Precinct Plans, which provide strategic guidance on tree planting priorities on streets. Implementation is also informed by Trees for Melbourne’s Climate Future—a research-based review of current and potential tree species to identify those most suitable for future temperatures.

The city of Melbourne manages less than 25 percent of the total area of the municipality. While well-established strategies exist for public land, the pressures of development, climate change, and an increasing population mean that the protection and enhancement of the urban forest within private property is more important than ever.

David Callow will outline the application of the Urban Forest Strategy and supporting tools for growing a resilient urban forest in Melbourne. He will also discuss initiatives that the city of Melbourne has implemented to increase greening on private property and some of the current and emerging challenges.


9:45 am–10:15 am
Break

10:15 am–10:35 am
Q&A Session: Growing a Climate Resilient City—A Melbourne Perspective on Urban Forestry
David Callow, Urban Forest and Ecology, City of Melbourne, Australia

10:35 am–12:05 pm
Scientific-Based Guidance in Selection of Right Tree for Right Site and Function
Henrik Sjöman, Swedish University of Agricultural Science & Gothenburg Botanical Garden

Henrik Sjöman will present several examples of ongoing research, including the monitoring and evaluation of a large number of tree species—those commonly used and those less employed.

The analysis focuses on the trees’ ability to grow in different urban environments and their capacity for delivering different ecosystem services. Much of the research is from field studies in native and natural environments. In the presentation, experiences from North America, China, Romania, Azerbaijan, the Republic of Georgia, and other areas will be presented, with the aim of discovering and identifying the urban trees of tomorrow.


12:05 pm–1:05 pm
Lunch and First-Timers Lunch

1:05 pm–1:25 pm
Q&A Session: Scientific-Based Guidance in Selection of Right Tree for Right Site and Function
Henrik Sjöman, Swedish University of Agricultural Science & Gothenburg Botanical Garden

1:25 pm–2:55 pm
Sustainable Urban Forest Management—A Critical Challenge
Matt Wells, MSc, MICFor, City of Santa Monica, Public Works, Public Landscape Division

Climate change and urbanization threatens terrestrial ecosystems and the populations that depend on them. Severe drought in California has caused significant damage to the state’s urban forests. Recent studies have also shown urban tree canopy declining in many cities nationwide, and this can often be associated with population densification and development.

Full Description →

Climate change and increased urbanization can damage the urban forest but is also mitigated by the ecosystem services it delivers. Therefore, planning for and delivering sustainability and environmental resilience is increasingly essential for communities globally. Strategically planned and systematic urban forestry management can maximize ecosystem services in an economically responsible manner. It can turn the concept of sustainability into reality by showing progress toward agreed goals through realistic metrics tracked within appropriate timeframes.

This presentation will explore how the critical challenge of urban forest sustainability is being approached by the city of Santa Monica, California. It will look at the six different metrics being used to judge the city’s success in this endeavor. The presentation will also describe how tree diversity, both in species and age range, are being planned for at a street and park level. Finally, the presentation will describe how GIS mapping and data analytics have been used to create a five-year street tree planting prioritization model in Santa Monica. This model uses eight metrics that consider the condition of the urban forest, environmental concerns, and human need.

Attendees at this presentation will increase their knowledge of how urban forest sustainability can be delivered through strategic planning, community partnership, and the timely tracking of key metrics. It will also describe the roles and responsibilities of municipal foresters, consultants, and tree companies in this endeavor.


2:55 pm–3:15 pm
Q&A Session: Sustainable Urban Forest Management—A Critical Challenge
Matt Wells, MSc, MICFor, City of Santa Monica, Public Works, Public Landscape Division

3:15 pm–3:45 pm
Break

3:45 pm–4:45 pm (Concurrent Sessions)
3:45 pm–4:15 pm
Practice Management Track
Case Capsule: How Bark Characteristics Determine Fire Tolerance in Native California Trees
Denice Britton, RCA #296, CalTLC

4:15 pm–4:45 pm
Practice Management Track
Bietner v. Zuckerman, The $550,000 Tree
Donald H. Godi, FASLA, PLA, RCA #444, TRAQ, Donald H. Godi & Associates, Inc.
3:45 pm–4:00 pm
Technical Track
Tahoe Basin Tree Evaluations and Management Plan, Part 1—Orientation and Planning
Torrey Young, RCA #282, Dryad, LLC

4:00 pm–4:15 pm
Technical Track
Tahoe Basin Tree Evaluations and Management Plan, Part 2—Implementation an the Partnering Experience
Katie Krebs, Katie J. Krebs—Consulting Arborist Services

4:15 pm–4:25 pm
Q&A Session: Tahoe Basin Tree Evaluations and Management Plan, Parts 1 and 2
Torrey Young, RCA #282, Dryad, LLC
Katie Krebs, Katie J. Krebs—Consulting Arborist Services

4:25 pm–4:45 pm
Oregon City v. Lindquist et al.
David Hunter, RCA #408, Certified Arborist LLC

4:45 pm–5:00 pm
Break

5:00 pm–5:30 pm
Riverland Preservation Project
Jeremy Chancey, RCA #646

In January 2015, DR Horton, one of the largest developers in the United States, announced its intent to build 14 two-story homes on a 5-acre parcel in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The Riverland area, though enveloped by urban living, is a unique woodland and wildlife environment, with old growth trees, flora, and wildlife in the immediate vicinity, including manatees, foxes, gopher tortoises, burrowing owls, barred owls, yellow crowned night herons, hawks, red-cockaded and pileated woodpeckers, osprey, butterflies, bees, amphibians, salamanders, and mole skinks, among others. Building 14 homes with swimming pools, driveways, and roads would effectively destroy the 485 trees on the property—if not during the building process, then in subsequent years as grade changes, root impacts, and pruning take their toll.

Full Description →

The Riverland area, though enveloped by urban living, is a unique woodland and wildlife environment, with old growth trees, flora, and wildlife in the immediate vicinity, including manatees, foxes, gopher tortoises, burrowing owls, barred owls, yellow crowned night herons, hawks, red-cockaded and pileated woodpeckers, osprey, butterflies, bees, amphibians, salamanders, and mole skinks, among others. Building 14 homes with swimming pools, driveways, and roads would effectively destroy the 485 trees on the property—if not during the building process, then in subsequent years as grade changes, root impacts, and pruning take their toll. Instead of standing by, a core group of neighbors took action, forming the Riverland Preservation Society (RPS), with Jeremy Chancey as president. As an arborist, Jeremy is uniquely qualified to speak to the potential impacts to the trees and the negative effects that removing them would have on the surrounding area. RPS worked tirelessly scheduling meetings and events to bring the community together, convening with city commissioners, the city manager, the head of the parks and rec department, DR Horton, the land owner, and more. After nearly two years, on September 12, 2016, city commissioners voted unanimously to purchase the 5-acre parcel as a neighborhood park. Named Riverland Preserve, the main purpose will be as passive use/nature restoration area.


5:30 pm–7:00 pm
Networking Reception

A casual setting with great food and drinks is a perfect way to end the day. This event allows you to get to know your fellow conference attendees on a more personal level.




Tuesday, December 10


7:00 am–6:00 pm
Registration

7:00 am–8:00 am
Continental Breakfast

8:00 am–9:30 am
Business Meeting

9:30 am–9:45 am
Break

9:45 am–11:15 am
Water to the Trees—The Changing Role of Trees in Water-Sensitive Urban Design
Joris G.W.F. Voeten, Urban Roofscapes

In light of climate change, European cities are experiencing urban floods during peak rain events and increasing water shortages in green infrastructure during the dry spells in between. With H2O nowadays, it seems to be either too much or too little, where “just enough” is of importance for green infrastructure and trees to perform the many needed ecosystem services, such as urban cooling by evapotranspiration and shading. To find an “urban aquatic equilibrium” new alliances are being forged between arborists and urban water managers; one has too much water to process and transport, and the other too little to evaporate. Both find that urban trees can be a very valuable, natural, local, efficient, and carbon neutral part of the solution.

Full Description →

A change in mindset is happening—from discharging rainwater to actually harvesting rainwater and using the harvested rainwater to sustain the urban forest. This presentation addresses quantifying the water model on which these systems are calculated and the resulting innovative water-management and tree-pit designs. Examples of constructed projects at both ground level and in roof gardens will illustrate how theory has been put to practice in several cities in the Netherlands. How trees, as the new urban water managers, fit perfectly in the new “Smart City” programs will be discussed as an integral part of the changing role of trees in urban water management.


11:15 am–11:30 am
Break

11:30 am–12:30 pm
Development of Biochar From Urban Forest Wood Waste and Utilization for Enhancing Urban Soil and Tree Growth
Kamran Abdollahi, Ph.D., Urban Forestry and Natural Resources, Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center

This session will introduce innovative utilization of biochars produced from urban forest waste and their applications as soil amendments for improving urban soils and tree growth. Urban wood waste and vegetative waste will be discussed as a component of the urban forest ecosystem. Sustainable streams of wood waste feedstock for biochar production will be illustrated. Biochars and their bioengineering productions will be discussed. Impacts of biochar on soil chemical and physical properties as well as the effect of biochars on tree growth and physiology will be explained. Specifically, the impacts on tree shoot growth, net-photosynthesis, respiration, transpiration, leaf chlorophyll content, and soil carbon flux will be presented. Results from the recent studies on biochar in Louisiana and other places will be shared and interpreted. Practical implications and science-based recommendations will be provided.


12:30 pm–1:30 pm
Networking Lunch

1:30 pm–2:45 pm
Applying the Morphophysiological Approach to Tree Stability Assessment
Stefania Gasperini, AR.ES
Giovanni Morelli, Progetto Verde

The shape of a tree is the expression of the dynamic relationship that binds each tree with the environment in which it grows. The form a tree acquired, however, is not simply a reaction to its environment, but also relies on the adherence to principles of tree architecture development. We will illustrate how these principles change according to the different species and how they evolve following the life of each individual tree. The relationship that links the crown architecture to the organization of the root system will be presented, as well as how it is possible to relate the architectural characteristics of a tree to biological, physiological, and pathological aspects.


2:45 pm–3:00 pm
Break

3:00 pm–4:00 pm (Concurrent Sessions)
3:00 pm–3:30 pm
Practice Management Track
Video Conferencing—How Can We Earn Billable Hours Without Leaving the Office?
Mark Porter, Mark's Tree Service & Consulting

Consulting clients, like other consumers, consistently seek two crucial things.

  1. Solutions to problems
  2. The anticipated good feelings of their purchase.

Full Description →

As consultants, what if we can provide both #1 and #2? And, what if we can produce it in 10 or 15 minutes? Can we still get paid? Yes, we can! Somebody calls with a problem, and if we can solve it over the phone or during a face-to-face video conference and save the client time and money, who wins? We all do!

We were introduced to Zoom video conferencing at the 2017 Annual Conference in Skamania, Washington. Mark Porter will share how he uses Zoom video conferencing with insurance adjusters, attorney clients, homeowners, city clients, property managers, and others. Hear his ideas for turning video conferencing into billable hours, even at times when faced with what seems like impossible deadlines, and all without leaving the office chair. Mark hopes you can put some of his discoveries to work and profit from it. Ideas and questions are encouraged.


3:00 pm–4:00 pm
Technical Track
What Do Trees Think of Pruning?
Lindsey Purcell, Purdue University, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources

Trees may not say much about pruning, but how they respond to this important arboriculture practice is often not fully understood by practitioners.

Often, pruning specifications and directives are provided without explanation of the biology behind our discourse. This session will provide a survey into the impact of pruning, including physiological and biomechanical responses from trees to improve outcomes.

3:30 pm–4:00 pm
Practice Management Track
Creating Connections With Landscape Architects Through Educational Opportunities
Lisa Smith, RCA #464, The Tree Resource

Consulting Arborists are commonly reviewing decisions, designs, and trees installed by other industry professionals. How are we connecting the dots and ensuring that our green partners have the latest knowledge and best management practices and are creating a green infrastructure that has the potential to truly benefit our urban canopy for decades to come? This talk will focus on finding educational opportunities, creating engaging curriculum, developing a student “tree toolbox” of industry guides, and making trees a priority on projects.

Full Description →

Teaching at one of the largest landscape architecture programs has provided Lisa Smith with the opportunity to develop a "Trees Materials" curriculum that engages the students, develops critical thinking, and offers an excellent introduction to trees and their characteristics, biology, growth potential, and all aspects related to their selection, installation, and care. This talk will focus on developing that curriculum and finding creative ways to engage the student, and learning how to find and promote these opportunities for your own consulting business.


4:00 pm–4:15 pm
Break

4:15 pm–5:15 pm
Judges’ and Jurors’ Expectations on Expert Testimony
Judge John W. Green, Retired

After listening to expert testimony as a judge and visiting with jurors after trial over a 30+ year career, including trials in retirement, Judge Green has accumulated a wealth of knowledge on what experts should do and not do in their testimony. Many experts have deviated from the role of the expert in court, often times without realizing it and always to the detriment of their client. There are common sense and technical rules that should be followed. These rules should be revisited by the seasoned expert and studied by the aspiring expert. Many of these rules, as well as how to present yourself and your testimony to the judge and jury and how to respect the ethics of your profession, will be presented.


5:15 pm–5:30 pm
Break

5:30 pm–6:30 pm
Roundtables

Join the speakers from the Annual Conference to delve into their topics and areas of expertise. Take advantage of the experience and knowledge available at the conference by participating in the roundtable discussions focused on topics of interest to Consulting Arborists.


6:00 pm–9:00 pm
Creole Queen Dinner Jazz Cruise (Optional Event)

Step back into the glamour and romance of the riverboat era with a cruise aboard the Paddlewheeler Creole Queen! Experience the lively sounds of the Jazz Band while enjoying a lavish Creole Buffet in our elegantly appointed dining room. After dinner, and maybe a little dancing, enjoy a classic New Orleans cocktail and sweet Mississippi River breezes on our promenade deck as the city skyline slips by under a canopy of stars. This nighttime cruise is pure New Orleans.

(The dinner cruise is a 0.7-mile walk from the InterContinental New Orleans)
Boarding 6:30 pm; Boat departs promptly at 7:00 pm.
$135/per person





Wednesday, December 11


7:00 am–12:30 pm
Registration

7:00 am–8:00 am
Continental Breakfast

8:00 am–9:00 am
The Ethical Expert in a Digital Era
Deni Elliott, D.Ed., University of South Florida

The ethics of providing expertise begins with competence but is dependent on a clear understanding of clients' expectations. Tests for impartiality are discussed, as are guidelines for developing one's own statement of consulting ethics. Examples of ethical issues confronted by Consulting Arborists are discussed, as are the ASCA Standards of Professional Practice.


9:00 am–9:15 am
Break

9:15 am–10:30 am
Understanding the Appraisal Problem
Scott Cullen, RCA #348

The appraisal problem is a careful and specific statement of the client’s question about value and its context. The appraisal problem is the basis for the appraisal assignment. The idea of the appraisal problem was included but not elaborated in the Guide for Plant Appraisal, 9th Edition. Detailed treatment of the appraisal problem is the single most important contribution of the 10th Edition.

Full Description →

This presentation will briefly review the place of the appraisal problem in the generally accepted standards and practice of appraisal and the six essential elements of each appraisal problem. Identifying and defining each of the problem elements is the key to meaningful tree and plant appraisal. Ample time is included for Q&A and audience interaction. Attendees should be familiar with Chapter 3 of the 10th Edition and the handout materials.


10:30 am–10:45 am
Break

10:45 am–11:45 am
Deposition
Adrianne L. Baumgartner, J.D., Porteous, Hainkel & Johnson, LLP

This session will cover not only your deposition as a witness but also your participation and assistance in evaluating the opposing expert report and your assistance to counsel in preparing the deposition. We will discuss how to prepare for questioning and how to present in a manner that will assist in evaluating and possibly resolving a case.


11:45 am–12:45 pm
A Tale of Two Hurricanes: Wind and Water Recovery After Gustav and Katrina
Fred Fellner, Ph.D., Louisiana State University
Malcolm Guidry, Ph.D., Consulting Arborist

Hurricane and tropical force winds, rain, and storm surge severely impacted southeast Louisiana and the coastal zone of Mississippi in fall 2005 and again in 2008, with mitigation costs reaching almost $170 billion. We will look beneath the big numbers and discuss the damages to the urban forest in New Orleans, on the campus at LSU, and in the coastal regions to better understand how the trees performed and assess their condition 10 years later.